Chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird. To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 13 2019-01-07

Chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird Rating: 6,2/10 1787 reviews

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 13

chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird

Scout explains she doesn't remember learning how to read, but it seems she always knew how. Boo was eventually brought back to the Radley home. The physical representation of this facet of childhood is represented in Jem's daring rush into the Radleys' yard, in which he enters a space that has been fundamentally condemned by the entire town. Blackstone's Commentaries one of the most important books ever written on British law, written by Sir William Blackstone 1723—80; Eng. Scout and Dill's relationship, though close, is still childish and innocent, as shown in the end of the chapter.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 23

chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird

While Scout's version allows people to get better through individual choice, in Aunt Alexandra's eyes, quality is a function of time more than anything. From Meridian, Mississippi, Dill will be spending the summer at the nearby house of Miss Rachel Haverford, his aunt. Scout learns that black people help one another like each one is family. . In this chapter, Atticus demonstrates his excellent skills as a lawyer. After the service, Reverend Syke's takes up a collection of money for Tom Robinson's wife, who has not been able to find work since her husband was brought up on charges of raping a white woman.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary

chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird

What is the name of the odd family in Maycomb? Then Dill suggests that they have a baby together, and even though he knows how babies are made, he makes up a long dreamy story about a magic island where babies are collected like flowers. When Scout explains that Walter can't pay back the lunch money Miss Caroline offered, the teacher taps Scout's hand with a ruler and makes her stand in the corner of the room. Later, toward the end of the school year, Jem and Scout find two polished Indian-head pennies, good luck tokens, inside the same knothole. At the window, Scout and Jem hoist Dill up to peek in the window. The chapter establishes that Atticus can relate to all kinds of people, including poor farm children.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 23

chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird

Aunt Alexandra tells Scout she cannot go back the next Sunday. However, Jem can remember his mother and Scout notices that he is occasionally nostalgic about her. Scout and Jem begin to notice that where they go about town, people seem to be whispering about them. Scout observes , whom she considers to be a rather good, sensible judge. Looking for a friendly face in the group, she recognizes Mr. Here we see how the law, which is meant to protect people, can sometimes be harmful if followed too absolutely.

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To Kill a Mockingbird, chapters 1

chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird

Dill and Scout keep watch in case anyone comes along, and Jem tries to deliver the note with the fishing pole, but finds that it's harder to maneuver than he expected. The children don't understand prejudice at its basest level, and Calpurnia seems to not possess it either. After this, they hear a voice nearby and Mr. However, Scout doesn't feel sorry for her considering her unfriendly treatment that morning. Aunt Alexandra would be quick to say that the finest black woman can't ever be a proper role model for a white child.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 13

chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird

Her teacher, Miss Caroline Fisher, is 21 years old and new to the Maycomb County schools. Dill makes up a story about playing strip poker to explain Jem's missing pants, and Jem says they were playing with matches rather than cards, which would be considered unforgivable. However, Jem and Scout lack the pride that Aunt Alexandra considers commensurate with being a Finch. This speech demonstrates the gulf between blacks and whites in Maycomb: not only do class distinctions and bigotry divide the two races, but language does as well. That night Atticus finally came home from working with the State.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 12

chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird

When the children return home, they find Aunt Alexandra waiting for them. Rather, the law must change to accommodate them and protect the children, who should not have to suffer needlessly. All the other children in the class understand this: growing up in this setting teaches children that people can behave a certain way simply because of the family or group that they come from. For some time now, Scout and Jem have railed against people who insulted Atticus' decision to defend Tom. Radley, but Jem insists on going. They sneak under a wire fence and go through a gate. Walter hesitates but then takes Jem up on the friendly offer.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary

chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird

Ewell is the next witness. Alexandria would condemn almost any other type of lifestyle and Jem thought it was funny because he thought that one day she would start a fight or something. Simply because of their racial prejudice, the townspeople are prepared to accept the word of the cruel, ignorant Bob Ewell over that of a decent black man. Scout and Jem listen intently to everything that is said in the courtroom. In the packed courthouse, the children have trouble getting seats until helps them find seats upstairs in the balcony where the black people sit. Mayella doesn't seem to have any friends.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 12

chapter 12 and 13 to kill a mockingbird

Cunningham about his son despite being surrounded by a hostile lynch mob. For instance, when various domesticated animals are mutilated and killed, townspeople still suspect Boo even after Crazy Addie is found guilty of this violence. Jem and Dill follow her, and Atticus orders Jem to go home. Cannas any of a genus Canna broad-leaved tropical plants, often grown for ornament because of the striking foliage and brilliant flowers. The children's attempts to connect with Boo evoke, again, the sense that children will be able to see Boo with more decency and sincerity than the rest of the populace. Dill's story about his experiences with his parents show Scout how much she has to be grateful for. The family lost its wealth in the Civil War.

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