Wizard of oz satire. Political interpretations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 2019-01-21

Wizard of oz satire Rating: 8,8/10 1086 reviews

Wizard of Oz Themed Stargate No Place Like Home Satire Teefury Men's Shirt NEW

wizard of oz satire

Then the beasts bowed down to the Lion as their King, and he promised to come back and rule over them as soon as Dorothy was safely on her way to Kansas. As a journalist and editor, he was familiar with the political events and controversies of the day, and he commented liberally on a number of them. But what does China have to do with Gilded Age politics? The film underwent about a dozen script drafts and four writers. The cap had already been used twice, once to enslave the Winkies and again to drive the Wizard out of the West, patent injustices committed through the power of gold. Like the Lion of Oz, Bryan was the last to “join” the party. Also significant in this quote is Baum's espousal of the value and virtue of love; this is a ubiquitous theme in fairy tales and children's books.

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Fun Facts Friday: Wizard of Oz as a Political Satire

wizard of oz satire

But that's not how I feel about it at all. Yet the Monkeys are not inherently bad; they have become so only through an unnatural and evil force. One element, however, was in the very first draft and never changed: Kansas in sepia, Oz in Technicolor. Throughout the movie, Dorothy has conversations with Toto, or her inner intuitive self. With the death of on January 16, 2014, he was the only surviving actor to have played a Munchkin until his death, on May 24, 2018. Why else claim that a children’s book’s was “written solely” for children unless the author wished to imply just the opposite? One significant innovation planned for the film was the use of stencil printing for the transition to Technicolor.

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Is The Wizard of Oz a satire of the French Revolution?

wizard of oz satire

The timely support of the mice parallels the importance of the common folk in BryanÂ’s bid for the presidency. Baum was given to occasional satirical touches in his work, I admit. They challenged the railroad companies, bankers and East Coast businessmen who kept agricultural prices low and freight costs high and insisted America remain on the gold standard. McKinley of Ohio, for example, supported the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890, voted for its repeal in 1893, and made the gold standard the cornerstone of his 1896 presidential bid. This is first made obvious when he figures out how the travelers can get across the great ditch in the middle of the forest. Another important principle found in Theosophy is reincarnation. He also had an allergic reaction to it.

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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Quotes and Analysis

wizard of oz satire

The postmortem on the symbolic reading of Baum soon followed. The Wizard fits this description, for “who the real Oz is,” Dorothy is informed, “no living person can tell. The question of Baum’s intention in writing Oz, though of interest to the literary sleuth, is clearly secondary to the allegory itself. The picture made more money on this release than on its original one, and reassessments by film critics were near-universally adoring. He is none other than William Jennings Bryan, the Nebraska representative in Congress and later the Democratic presidential candidate in 1896 and 1900. Baum was not the first to use the metaphor.


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Wizard Of Oz

wizard of oz satire

. On the surface, Oz appears to be a perfect utopia to Dorothy. There is no ambiguity present. Acknowledging in advance my debt to Littlefield, Rockoff, and Dighe, I attempt to give such an account here. The name of Dorothy’s canine companion, Toto, is also a pun, a play on teetotaler. While midwestern farmers backed the Populists, many southern rural people out of traditional loyalty to the Democrats and racism — this was only decades after the effective end of. For the 1901 Broadway production Baum inserted explicit references to prominent political characters such as President.

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The Wizard of Oz (1939)

wizard of oz satire

Dorothy Gale, Film, Gender 660 Words 2 Pages Sam Stillerman Wizard of Oz Allegorical Analysis 3rd Period Mrs. The Scarecrow's quick thinking continues all the way to the end of the novel. She was very old, traveled by bubble and did not know anything about the Ruby Slippers. For a quarter of a century after its film debut, no one seemed to think otherwise. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 1991. She embarks on an obstacle filled journey into Natchez to acquire medicine for her.


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Wizard Of Oz

wizard of oz satire

This grim depiction reflects the forlorn condition of Kansas in the late 1880s and early 1890s, when a combination of scorching droughts, severe winters, and an invasion of grasshoppers reduced the prairie to an uninhabitable wasteland. For those who were “different” including resident blacks , the South could be a dangerous place indeed. Each predator is summoned by blowing on a silver whistle, another example of a malicious use of the white metal. Is he represented by the Lion and the Wizard? New York Times, February 7. In The Historian’s Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Being that the Wizard of Oz was a play, special effects cannot. In the end he lost to the Republican candidate, William McKinley, by 95 electoral votes.

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What does it all mean? Scholars study ‘The Wizard of Oz’

wizard of oz satire

Frank Baum Discovered the Great American Story During her journey along the Yellow Brick Road, Dorothy encounters Scarecrow, Tin Woodman and Cowardly Lion who are respectively searching for a brain, a heart, and courage. The Populists wanted silver coins to become legal tender to expand the money supply and counteract the deflation. In the balloon’s basket are caricatures of Populist leaders, preaching the “Platform of Lunacy. At the Democratic National Convention in 1896, the assembled delegates nominated William Jennings Bryan, an avid supporter of free silver, for president. While not evil or malicious, he still tricked people into believing he was something he was not. This allegory is mostly in line with the populist movement, a quickly growing belief that bankers and corporations controlled the two major parties in America. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press.


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